The Houston Midtown Chapter of The Society for Financial Awareness Presents MONEY MATTERS with Christopher Hensley

Nearly half of all working Americans could risk losing their jobs because of technology. It’s not only blue-collar jobs at stake. Millions of educated knowledge workers—writers, paralegals, assistants, medical technicians—are threatened by accelerating advances in artificial intelligence.

The industrial revolution shifted workers from farms to factories. In the first era of automation, machines relieved humans of manually exhausting work. Today, Era Two of automation continues to wash across the entire services-based economy that has replaced jobs in agriculture and manufacturing. Era Three, and the rise of AI, is dawning. Smart computers are demonstrating they are capable of making better decisions than humans. Brilliant technologies can now decide, learn, predict, and even comprehend much faster and more accurately than the human brain, and their progress is accelerating. Where will this leave lawyers, nurses, teachers, and editors?

In Only Humans Need Apply, Thomas Hayes Davenport and Julia Kirby reframe the conversation about automation, arguing that the future of increased productivity and business success isn’t either human or machine. It’s both. The key is augmentation, utilizing technology to help humans work better, smarter, and faster. Instead of viewing these machines as competitive interlopers, we can see them as partners and collaborators in creative problem solving as we move into the next era. The choice is ours.

 
We were joined by Thomas Davenport co-author of the book Only Humans Need Apply: Winners and Losers in the Age of Smart Machines.

Direct download: MMEPISODE146.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:39pm PST
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Most parents will do just about anything to secure happy lives and bright futures for their kids. Add in competition with other parents and near-constant pressure, their drive to give their kids the best of everything can backfire, setting back the child and the household finances.

Brett Graff, "The Home Economist," exposes how overspending can harm children by setting back intellect and encouraging narcissism, depression and unhealthy or unsafe habits. By unearthing research on pricey baby gear, oversized houses, so-called "educational" toys and after-school lessons, expensive sports equipment and private coaching, even certain organic products and unregulated "natural" medicines - she even has eye-opening findings on private schools versus public schools - Graff proves that we can spend too much getting our kids ahead and wind up instead setting them back. 

 
Not Buying It proves that sound, rational decision-making about spending is far more beneficial for our kids than purchases made out of fear, pressure and confusion. With Graff's guidance, you'll confidently create the financial strategy that's best for your family, not the one pushed by marketers or practiced by your neighbors. Not Buying It is your blueprint for emotional and financial freedom, and the stability your children deserve.


We were joined by Brett Graff, The Home Economist .

Brett Graff is a former US government economist who today is a family finance expert reporting the information that helps families maximize their money and their lives. A nationally syndicated columnist, her pieces – called THE HOME ECONOMIST – run first in The Miami Herald and then in over 400 media outlets across the country including the Chicago Tribune and The Kansas City Star.

Direct download: MMEpisode145.mp3
Category:Financial Literacy -- posted at: 12:28pm PST
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